What to do now that Facebook won’t let you force people to like your page

What to do now that Facebook won’t let you force people to like your page

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The folks at ShortStack — a service that helps you create apps and interesting things on Facebook Pages — have some excellent thoughts on what Facebook’s decision to ban fan-gating on Pages, and tips for how to adjust your Page.

At ShortStack we have over 350,000 customers, all of whom are Facebook Page Admins. I’m always analyzing the data from our platform, and in recent months I’ve seen (and supported) a shift away from like-gating. In May we released an eBook  titled Why Every Business Should Stop Obsessing Over Facebook Likes that has been well-received. We’ve also redesigned the entire ShortStack platform to allow marketers to build Campaigns that can achieve their goals independent from like-gating.  Our recommended best practice is that businesses should be collecting actionable and valuable data such as emails, customer feedback…anything that is critical to their goals. If the customer wants to like your Page as well, that’s great, just don’t force them to.

Read the full post: “Facebook Bans Like-Gating: Here’s What Marketers Can Do.”

Photo credit: Denis Dervisevic on Flickr

Cynthia on AwesomeCast 212: “Commercial Weeds”

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Please enjoy another fast-paced and super-informative episode of AwesomeCast with Cynthia joining the panel:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42hLIfNYESY

Topics include:

  • An app that can help you with your to-do list; Timeful. – 2:40
  • A roku built right into a TV. – 5:15
  • The WWE Supercard app. – 10:20
  • The Ice Bucket Challenge for ALS. – 15:15
  • A replacement for turntable.fm… plug.dj! – 26:30
  • HP building a $199 Windows laptop. – 31:20
  • A discussion on the usefulness of a laptop like that.
  • Google releasing another app for iOS; the Photo Sphere Camera. – 37:15
  • The role of social media in the situation in Ferguson. – 45:40
  • Changes to Facebook Likes and what information gets filtered on social media. – 57:00

No doubt I could list way more than seven elements from perfect blog posts, but these seven seem to cover all the most important bases.

  1. Headline: the 6 words that count most
  2. Storytelling hook
  3. Fewer characters per line at first
  4. Featured image
  5. Subheads for scanning
  6. Content and the 1,500-word sweet spot
  7. Soundbites for sharing

Interesting research that validates the trends we all see on the web. Read the full post here: http://blog.bufferapp.com/perfect-blog-post-research-data

Pictures + words = better social sharing

Pictures + words = better social sharing

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You’ve seen them: pictures with words embedded in them, and words presented as images. They’re everywhere across the web. Some are memes, but more are quotes, advice, and inspirational sayings.

People identify with quotes and jokes and insights, and then they share them, both to help others and to say what they themselves are about.

They’re also a great way to spread the word about an upcoming event:

You don’t always need to have a photo or image in the background. The words themselves can be the image.

For more ideas of how images and words can complement each other (and for a little inspiration to go with), check out the images in this Huffington Post article listing wise quotes by Bill Murray.

And it’s not all decoration: There’s research to show that tweets and posts using images with embedded text get more shares and interaction. See for example “Stop Trying to Get Your Blog Posts Shared and Do This Instead” and “A/B Test: Why You Need to Include Photos in Your Tweets.”

Now that you’re sold on the plan to add thoughts and quotes in this form to your content mix, in a way that fits with your overall message, how can you create these images?

  • If you have an image editor, like Adobe Photoshop or Adobe Elements, that’s more than up to the task. You could even create a layered template to make it simpler to make consistent images quickly. If you work with a graphic designer, have her or him create some layouts for you.
  • Online photo editors like Picmonkey, Pixlr, and iPiccy usually include the ability to add text to an image, with a small selection of fonts.
  • Free sites like Picfont and Piclits are made specifically for creating images with embedded words. They generally have fewer design options, but they’re also hard to mess up.
  • Noteography is a web and mobile app for making images of just words — excellent for quotations.
  • Meme generators like Meme Generator help you build meme images, using the normal meme-standard fonts and frequently used images. Memes are a world and style unto themselves. If you want an image that fits that style, it’s easier to use a generator than to try copying from scratch.

Some tips for making a great, shareable text image:

Make sure you have the right to use the background image. You can’t easily credit the image source once you’ve posted the image to Twitter and elsewhere, so Flickr and other sources of Creative Commons images aren’t your best bet for choosing an image for the background. Instead, take your own photo, buy a photo, use one that comes with your photo editing tool, or use a plain background. Using someone else’s image without proper permission or rights is stealing, and a very bad choice.

Keep the text readable. If the image is busy — has a lot of detail throughout, with no blank or open space — put a translucent background box behind the text, or use drop shadows or outlining on the text, so it stands out. Use a simpler, bolder font face to enhance readability.

Go easy on the number of fonts and sizes of letters. Using one or two at most allows the text to stay readable. (Yes, you can find marvelous examples of text images that use lots of font faces. These are created by people who studied design and know how far to push the boundaries. If that’s not you, stick to what’s sure to work.)

If the text is very long and it’s hard to find an image on which it fits, you can skip the background photograph and use a solid or paper-effect background.

Embed your URL, name, or other identifier in the image, so people can trace it back to you. Once an image is re-shared, any links in your original post can be lost or disconnected from the image. Including a visual link back to yourself gives people a chance to find out who created the image in the first place.

Embed a hashtag too if the image is part of a campaign. For example, this post from the White House promotes a twitter campaign.

Track what happens, and notice which images and text get shared more. Also keep an eye out for others to reshare. And note which resonate the most for you.

“Ms. Closkey, president of Downtown Web design firm Big Big Design, noted that over the past five to seven years, Pittsburgh’s tweeters and bloggers have tapped into a deeply philanthropic vein and produced some remarkable charitable efforts as a result.

“‘It’s interesting because people talk about Twitter being like a water cooler or a cocktail party,’ Ms. Closkey said. ‘I think social media offers technological tools to allow people do to more of what they do in real life. We see tweetups that happen around a charity or a group of people who have a cause.’” Continue reading

How mobile is your website?

How mobile is your website?

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Have you looked at your website on a smartphone or a tablet? How does it look?

It might be that you can see the whole of your site, with the logo and all the home page images visible, all shrunk down to fit the little screen. And maybe when you see this, you think, “It’s all there. It’s fine!”

But is it fine? Can you use the menu to get to other pages? Can you read what’s on the site? Can you find an address, or phone number, or some way to get in touch?

And how long did that page take to load, anyway?

For a website to be usable on a phone or tablet, it needs to work well. It doesn’t need to look exactly the same as it does on a desktop or laptop computer; in fact, it’s probably going to have to look a little different, just because of how the screen sizes and shapes differ.

And just because a site looks OK on one smartphone doesn’t mean it will look good on others.

BigBigDesign.com on an iPhone 3 or 4, according to ResponsinatorOne useful tool for exploring how websites look on various mobile browsers is the Responsinator site, which emulates many popular mobile screens (and some less popular ones). Go to http://www.responsinator.com/ and type a web address into the field at the very top, and you’ll see how it renders on different screen sizes. You can even scroll within the emulated devices to check out other pages and to see how menus work.

Some smartphone behavior doesn’t work the same in the Responsinator as it would on the actual device, if the website uses device detection scripts to modify its behavior. But this gives a partial sense of how a site behaves on smaller screens.

Being able to adjust to screen size is only part of what a website needs to be mobile-friendly. Phones rely on cellphone and data networks that can be slow or unreliable, so a site should be careful about overtaxing them.

Google offers PageSpeed Tools for testing a website to see how long it takes to load and where its bottlenecks or resource drains are. PageSpeed Tools is aimed more at web developers than at the average website or blog owner. But it can give you a heads-up if something is really bogging your site down, both for mobile devices and for desktop visitors.

Knowing there’s a problem is one thing; knowing how to fix it is another. In an upcoming post I’ll talk about options for making your website mobile — from adding a mobile alternative to redesigning with mobile devices in mind.

Photo credit for cover image: Dru Bloomfield on Flickr

Everybody knows that most passwords will remain unchanged. Yet our collective response to Heartbleed has been to patch our servers and email users asking them to do something we know most of them won’t do.

Here’s what our response should have been:

ALTER TABLE users DROP COLUMN password;

It turns out that passwords are obsolete, and they have been for a long time. Like the occasional pay phone you find in the back of a run-down restaurant, passwords have been unnecessary for years. The difference is that everyone laughs and reminisces when they see a pay phone, but nobody does that when they see a password field. But they should.

From “Passwords Are Obsolete, and they make Heartbleed a thousand times worse.” Interesting and worth a read.